Improving the Practice of Conservation

 

Lessons from The Field March 2017

Collaborating for Conservation

Becky Cole-Will (Acadia National Park) accompanies Fred Johnson (IMMWHA) on a worm-along

Becky Cole-Will (Acadia National Park) accompanies Fred Johnson (IMMWHA) on a worm-along

Ever wonder what happens in the intertidal zone – that area that is above water at low tide and under water at high tide? As it turns out, lots happens! And lots of people use and benefit directly or indirectly from this area teeming with life. On February 28, 2017, many of these people came together to discuss and work collaboratively to help keep the intertidal zone healthy. This workshop, organized and hosted by Acadia National Park and the Schoodic Institute, with support from Maine Sea Grant and FOS, was the second in a series of workshops that are bringing together a wide range of stakeholders, including clammers, wormers, researchers, park officials, educators, and local and state government representatives. This group is collaborating on how to best manage and conserve the intertidal zone for existing and future generations. Using tools and processes promoted under the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation, stakeholders worked to clarify key actions for the immediate future and the rationale for these actions. One action sure to foster greater understanding

Workshop participants sort through results expected from a strategy to cultivate relationships

Workshop participants sort through results expected from a strategy to cultivate relationships

and collaboration is the “ride-along” (or “clam-along”) where representatives from different interests get a chance to accompany one another on work outings. Reactions to the workshop and process were overwhelmingly positive – as an example, one stakeholder expressed, the process was “really, really valuable. I feel very grateful to have been here! I liked the…collaborative emergent organization.” While relationships between harvesters and law enforcers in the region have been tense in recent months, this workshop and the alliances formed through it are a bright spot showing the strength of open dialogue and a common language and solid tools for framing discussions and making decisions.

 

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To protect or neglect? Design, monitoring, and evaluation of a law enforcement strategy to recover small populations of wild tigers and their prey

FOS team member, Arlyne Johnson, and colleagues published a powerful article illuminating the importance of going “full cycle” in the Open Standards process. Published in Biological Conservation in 2016, the paper To protect or neglect? Design, monitoring, and evaluation of a law enforcement strategy to recover small populations of wild tigers and their prey illustrates how a results chain and associated theory of change was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a recent law enforcement strategy to recover tigers and their prey in Lao PDR.

Find the article here!

Photo credit: WCS Lao PDR

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Vote for Open Standards Case Studies! Learn from Your Colleagues!

CMP and CCNet judges have narrowed down 5 cases for the Open Standards Case Study Competition. Now, they need help from the conservation community to select the top 3. This is a great opportunity to learn from others around the world who are using the Open Standards! (Each case is only 2-5 pages). Click here to learn more and vote!

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Version 2.0 of Threats and Actions Classification Available

CMP members have officially approved an updated version of its Threats and Actions Classifications!

Published in 2008 in Conservation Biology, the IUCN-CMP Threat and Action Classifications (Version 1.0) have been used to classify tens of thousands of species, projects, and sites. These classifications have provided a much-needed framework to classify conservation threats and actions using a common language – thus, setting the foundation for sharing experiences and learning from one another.

As useful as Version 1.0 has been, practice revealed gaps and areas needing clarification and improvement. Version 2.0 incorporates experiences from several organizations and individuals using the classifications across hundreds of projects.

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CMP-CCNet Case Study Competition – Deadline Extended to 15 Sept!

The Conservation Coaches Network (CCNet) and The Conservation Measures Partnership (CMP) are jointly launching a competition for Adaptive Management Case Studies:

  • Are you managing a conservation project?
  • Are you willing to share your lessons learned with your peers around the world?
  • Do you want to win fabulous prizes?
  • Are you looking for everlasting fame and glory?

If you answered yes to these questions, then you should enter the CMP – CCNet Global Adaptive Management Case Study Competition.

What: We are looking to gather and share good examples of adaptive management practice across the conservation community. To this end, we are asking folks around the world to send us their case studies.

Fabulous Prizes: As incentives, the top-rated entry will receive a travel grant of US $2000 and two runners up will receive travel grants of US $500 each. All reasonable entries will be posted on our web-sites and the top 10 rated entries will be featured on in CMP & CCNet materials (hence the everlasting fame and glory) and will also receive a 1-year Miradi Software subscription.

How to Enter: Submit a 2-3 page description of your case study and a link to a succinct web-page, video, Google document, PDF file, or other web-shareable overview describing the case study to conservation practitioners. Click here for detailed instructions and the template form. To be eligible for prizes, entries must be received by 15 September 2016.

Please share this announcement widely with friends and colleagues.

Address questions to info@conservationmeasures.org.

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